Lit and Mind Winter Reading Group, led by Urban Kordes

On January 29th, Visiting Scholar and Cognitive Scientist Urban Kordes joined us for Lit and Mind’s Winter Reading Group Meeting. Professor of cognitive science and first-person research at the University of Ljubljana, Dr. Kordes currently serves as head of the cognitive science program. He as well teaches at the University of Vienna, Austria (cognitive science), University of Primorska, Koper, Slovenia (methodology) and Nan Tien Institute, Wollongong, Australia (cognitive science & mindfulness). Professor Kordes holds a bachelor’s degree in mathematical physics, and a master’s & doctorate in philosophy of cognitive science. His research interests include in-depth empirical phenomenology, neurophenomenology, enactivism, and neuroaesthetics.

Kordes Event

Professor Kordes led a discussion on Thomas Fuchs and Hanne De Jaegher’s “Enactive Intersubjectivity: Participatory Sense-Making and Mutual Incorporation” and chapter seven of Charles Fernyhough’s The Voices Within: The History and Science of How We Talk to Ourselves (“Chorus of Me”). Lit and Mind graduate student Rebecca Baker chose and presented on our third reading, Jorge Luis Borges’s “Tlon, Uqbar, Orbis Tertius,” weaving our earlier conversation into the literature.

Graduate Course: Psychosomatics

fig9Instructor: Aranye Fradenburg

Course: Engl 236, Fall 2016

“Interaction is the conscious or unconscious exchange of behavioral or nonbehavioral, sensible and intelligible signs from the whole arsenal of somatic and extrasomatic [cultural, social and environmental] systems.”

– Fernando Poyatos, “Nonverbal Communication in Interaction: Psychology and Literature”

The purpose of this course is to broaden our understanding of the somatic and environmental features of expressive (and impressive) experience.  Readings will draw primarily on the recent revitalization of interest in psychosomatics occasioned by neuroscientific developments in distributed cognition/affect, but will also include social-psychological studies in nonverbal communication (especially paralanguage), enactivist research, and biosemiotics.  Authors will include Elizabeth A. Wilson (Psychosomatic:  Feminism and the Neurological Body and Gut Feminism); Brian Massumi (ed. A Shock to Thought: Expression After Deleuze and Guattari);  Andy Clark (Supersizing the Mind); Giovanna Colombetti  (The Feeling Body); Aleksandra Kostic and Derek Chadee (eds. The Social Psychology of Nonverbal Communication); Fernando Poyatos (Nonverbal Communication Across Disciplines and Crosscultural Perspectives in Nonverbal Communications); Marilia Aisenstein and Elsa Rappoport de Aisemberg (eds. Psychosomatics Today: A Psychoanalytic Perspective); Donald Favareau (ed. Essential Readings in Biosemiotics), and Daniel Paul Schreber (Memoirs of My Nervous Illness).  If possible, students should have read Darwin’s Expression of Emotions in Man and Animals and Freud’s Studies in Hysteria before the class begins.

Image: “Fig. 9: Cat, savage and prepared to fight, drawn from life by Mr. Wood,” from Charles Darwin, The Expression of Emotion in Man and Animals